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VALENTINA DI FELICE

Acute change of titin at mid-sarcomere remains despite 8 wk of plyometric training.

  • Autori: Macaluso, F.; Isaacs, A.; DI FELICE, V.; Myburgh, K.
  • Anno di pubblicazione: 2014
  • Tipologia: Articolo in rivista (Articolo in rivista)
  • OA Link: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/93845

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate skeletal muscle changes induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise (PlyEx) both before and after PlyEx training, to understand if titin is affected differently after PlyEx training. Methods: Healthy untrained individuals (N=11) completed the 1stPlyEx (10x10 squat-jumps, 1min rest). Thereafter, 6 subjects completed 8 weeks of PlyEx, while 5 controls abstained from any jumping activity. Seven days after the last training session all subjects completed the 2ndPlyEx. Blood samples were collected before, 6 hours and 1, 2, 3 and 4 days after each acute bout of PlyEx, and muscle biopsies 4 days before and 3 days after each acute bout of PlyEx. Results: The 1stPlyEx induced an increase in circulating myoglobin concentration. Muscle sample analysis revealed Z-disk streaming, a stretch or a fragmentation of titin (immunogold), and increased calpain-3 autolysis. After training, 2ndPlyEx did not induce Z-disk streaming, or calpain-3 activation. The previously observed post-1stPlyEx positional change of the titin c-terminus was still present pre-2ndPlyEx, in all trained and all control subjects. Only 2 controls presented with Z-disk streaming after 2ndPlyEx, while calpain-3 activation was absent in all controls. Discussion: Eccentric explosive exercise induced a stretch or fragmentation of titin, which presented as a positional change of the c-terminus. Calpain-3 activation does not occur when titin is already stretched before explosive jumping. Enzymatic digestion results in titin fragmentation, but since an increase in calpain-3 autolysis was visible only after the 1stPlyEx acute bout, fragmentation cannot explain the prolonged positional change.